ROY HENRY VICKERS GALLERY
JELLY - LAMINATE MOUNT
$40.00

JELLY - LAMINATE MOUNT

Edition Date: November 2013
Artist: Roy Henry Vickers
Medium: Framed Foam Core Art Mount
Image Size: 6.25" x 8.5"

I've called them jellyfish ever since I was a boy living in Kitkatla B.C. I learned this year that they are not actually fish they are plankton and some are microscopic in size while others range up to several feet long. As a gillnet fisherman on the coast, I was very familiar with jellies when they came on board in my net, my hands would sting from their tentacles. As plankton they are very important to the food chain in the ocean, there are some fish like the sockeye that feed on the plankton. The presence of plankton in the ocean indicates the health of the ocean. One powerful memory I have of gillnet days is lying on the bow of my Dad's boat, the Eliza, and watching the prow cut through the phosphorescent sea at night. It was like flying through a sky of stars as they lit up the sea when they were tossed aside in the bow wave of our boat. This rendition of Jelly is dedicated to memories of gillnetting on the coast of British Columbia.

Story

I've called them jellyfish ever since I was a boy living in Kitkatla B.C. I learned this year that they are not actually fish they are plankton and some are microscopic in size while others range up to several feet long. As a gillnet fisherman on the coast, I was very familiar with jellies when they came on board in my net, my hands would sting from their tentacles. As plankton they are very important to the food chain in the ocean, there are some fish like the sockeye that feed on the plankton. The presence of plankton in the ocean indicates the health of the ocean. One powerful memory I have of gillnet days is lying on the bow of my Dad's boat, the Eliza, and watching the prow cut through the phosphorescent sea at night. It was like flying through a sky of stars as they lit up the sea when they were tossed aside in the bow wave of our boat. This rendition of Jelly is dedicated to memories of gillnetting on the coast of British Columbia.