ROY HENRY VICKERS GALLERY
Sockeye - FRAMED LITHOGRAPH
Sockeye - FRAMED LITHOGRAPH
$100.00

Sockeye - FRAMED LITHOGRAPH

Edition Date: June 2001
Artist: Roy Henry Vickers
Medium: Framed Lithograph
Image Size: 9 5/8" x 9 5/8"
Framed Size: 14 7/8" x 14 7/8"

Every year, for thousands of years, the Kitkatla people have seen a return of Sockeye salmon to the creeks and rivers of their homeland. This species of salmon is the most precious to our people. I recall from my youth the early Summer days filled with smoke from many fires. The smokehouse was full of Sockeye and there were many open fires where large drums were filled with canned salmon and boiled until a good seal was obtained. The work of preparing this delicacy for Winter storage is an age-old tradition.

So the moon in July is known as the Moon of Sockeye among the Kitkatlas.

As I write this article, I am aware that very few Sockeye are returning to the creeks of their birth to spawn. Overfishing and careless logging practices have brought an end to some runs, while others are dangerously close to extinction. It is my prayer, that we will work to ensure an increase in wild stocks to the ancient territories of the Kitkatla people.

I hope that, once more we will see the happy faces of our people as we celebrate an increase in the return of this beautiful salmon known to the world as Sockeye.

Story

Every year, for thousands of years, the Kitkatla people have seen a return of Sockeye salmon to the creeks and rivers of their homeland. This species of salmon is the most precious to our people. I recall from my youth the early Summer days filled with smoke from many fires. The smokehouse was full of Sockeye and there were many open fires where large drums were filled with canned salmon and boiled until a good seal was obtained. The work of preparing this delicacy for Winter storage is an age-old tradition.

So the moon in July is known as the Moon of Sockeye among the Kitkatlas.

As I write this article, I am aware that very few Sockeye are returning to the creeks of their birth to spawn. Overfishing and careless logging practices have brought an end to some runs, while others are dangerously close to extinction. It is my prayer, that we will work to ensure an increase in wild stocks to the ancient territories of the Kitkatla people.

I hope that, once more we will see the happy faces of our people as we celebrate an increase in the return of this beautiful salmon known to the world as Sockeye.